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New Schools Superintendent to Earn $260,500

Mamaroneck’s incoming schools superintendent will get a raise from his old job, but will receive slightly less than the person he is replacing.

The Mamaroneck School District’s contract with its new superintendent, Dr. Robert Shaps, calls for a base salary of $255,000 plus $5500 paid into a retirement account, for a total of $260,500. The superintendent will be required to pay 10% of the cost of his healthcare premiums. (Click for a copy of the contract with Dr. Shaps.)

Currently, Dr. Shaps’ pay package totals $235,434 as superintendent in Ardsley, according to  SeeThroughNY.com. The package for his predecessor, Dr. Paul Fried, was $268,623, according to the same source.

The Mamaroneck School Board appointed Dr. Robert Shaps as superintendent, effective July 1.

Dr. Shaps’ contract with the district is for three years, as was the original contract between Dr. Fried and the district.

For most years of Dr. Fried’s employment, he and the Mamaroneck Board of Education signed amendments which modified some of the terms and increased the annual salary.

Dr. Fried’s basic salary, as stipulated in his contracts, went from $215,000 in 2005—2006, to $231,662 (up 7%) in 2006-2007; $244,403 (up 5%) in 2007-2008; and $260,901 (up 7%) for 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. In each year, he also received $5500 in district contributions toward a retirement account. He received an additional $5400 for a car allowance, which is not included in Dr. Shaps’ contract.  (Click for a copy of the contract with Dr. Fried.)

The Journal News noted this week that superintendents in eight Westchester school districts were retiring or moving to other positions this year or next. In addition to Mamaroneck and Ardsley, districts whose superintendents were leaving include Pleasantville, Lakeland, Fleishman, Somers, Valhalla and Briarcliff. The Journal News listed base salaries for the departing leaders as ranging from $224,395 (Diane Ramos-Kelly in Valhalla) to $276,204 (Frances Wills of Briarcliff).  Dr. Shaps’ salary was listed at $228,000.

Dr. Fried will get a salary of $211,200 in Montville, according to NorthJersey.com. He is also eligible for a pension from New York State.



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11 comments to New Schools Superintendent to Earn $260,500

  • Still Confused

    Why is nothing being done to prevent the same problems we had with Dr Fried being repeated?
    These salaries and compensation packages should take into consideration that these supers will not actually be retiring.

  • Irene Byrne Ohl

    Really? R E A L L Y ? Unbelievable!!!! Great negotiation school board members!

    Are the taxpayers supposed to be happy that the new super gets a $25K raise from his old job? The spin is that we get a $8K “pay rollback”?

    YIKES! We need a C H A N G E voters!

  • Bemused

    after the screams about fat cat bankers….How can the BoT justify increasing his salary by 10% from what he received before at a time when everyone is being asked to to take cuts and he has not yet performed.

  • Anon E Mous

    A national search to find a neighbor and award a 10% FIRST YEAR raise, while the outgoing candidate retires and takes a 20% cut in another position in NJ. Any wonder why the search firm had so little difficulty finding candidates?

    The scary part is that it’s so believable!

    The Board does not need to justify it. It just needs to find the money, and the new Superintendent needs to find the way to deliver the required service, when the community VOTES NO to the budget on May 18th. Clearly the residents need to be the ones teach.

    ‘You will find that the State is the kind of organization which, though it does big things badly, does small things badly, too.’ – John Kenneth Galbraith

  • Groundhog Day

    Is this the same BOE that rejected the MTA’s proposal? This is very disappointing.

  • Are You Kidding Me?

    And required to pay just 10% of his healthcare costs? Try 20, 30, 40, or more than 50%, like my spouse, for our family’s healthcare!! Reality check!!!

    This kind of package has set this man up for instant disapproval ratings by the taxpayers.

  • sick

    Wait ! there’s more. As per Sect 5d, he will start with 40 days sick leave (read : deferred cash) then accrues 15 days more every year from next year and be able to cash them all at the end (up to 205 days). From day 1 he gets about 80,000$ in the bag. Dues for 7 trade associations paid for. All insurances paid for. All bank holidays of the Catholic and Jewish faith (why stop there ? here¨s a thought) – with make up day if the calendar is not obliging. How can we expect the unions to be accommodating when an incoming superintendent gets all the salary level,benefits and perks of the good old days ? Read this, voters, and add it to your decision criteria.

  • Anon E Mous

    Another search, better results, lower costs:

    ‘Reaching far beyond the walls of City Hall, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg on Friday appointed Stephen Goldsmith, a former mayor of Indianapolis and a management guru at Harvard University, to the powerful post of deputy mayor for operations. eaching far beyond the walls of City Hall, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg on Friday appointed Stephen Goldsmith, a former mayor of Indianapolis and a management guru at Harvard University, to the powerful post of deputy mayor for operations.’

    In what was considered a daring experiment, Mr. Goldsmith cut $100 million from the Indianapolis budget by forcing city agencies to bid against private corporations for contracts for about 50 services — even filling potholes.

    As deputy mayor, he will earn $213,000 a year. He lives in Washington but said he would soon begin house hunting in New York City. – NYT, 05/01/2010

  • sick

    I reviewed quickly the Fried/Shaps contracts, supposedly drawn up in very different economic circumstances, with all sorts of call for fiscal responsibility and adulthood rained on the District Board. And here’s the result : there are no substantial differences. Similar perks (regarding the most outrageous, the bank of sick days, F got 30 upfront + 19 per year, successor gets 40 upfront + 15 per year). Shaps gets no built-in increase, but there is a whole paragraph about merit increase, with no performance metrics and no cap. Wall Street has to justify bonuses, with caps, clawbacks and performance measurement, you see, but M’neck District does not have to. Next step : MTA does the same analysis, and comes back next year with a request that their contract too be unchanged in the main. Well done Board. See you at the polls.

  • taxpayer

    The real killer for us taxpayers are the pensions – - why does he get a contribution to a retirement account AND a pension (it says “NY State”, but I’m sure we are funding it)?

    How much of his pension is on top of this pay?

  • agree with remarkable

    http://www.nystrs.org/main/employers/contribution-rate.htm

    The estimated ECR [employer contribute rate] applicable to 2010-11 member salaries is 8.62%. NYSTRS’ Retirement Board will formally adopt a rate at its July meeting.

    Not sure if this is exactly the scheme (what a good word) that the Supers are under, but it gives an idea. This rate is currently artificially low because of smoothing of good results of the pre-2008 and 2009 years, and non-inclusion yet of the bad results of those years (they will be smoothed out too) but you can safely expect 15% contribution rates in the coming years. So take those salaries, and add 15% at the taxpayer’s expense (most employees do not contribute in NYS, after 10 years. Nor will they pay NY income tax on their huge pensions, by the way).