Gazette Ceases Publication: Donates Archives to LHS


In 2010, the Larchmont Gazette ceased publication. In 2011 the publishers donated all contents to the Larchmont Historical Society, which will continue to make the Gazette archives available online.



All inquiries should be addressed to the Larchmont Historical Society.


Comments closed

Review: The Book of Illusions

One of the joys of belonging to a book club is discovering authors one has not read. So, the initial title read for the book club serves as a sort of appetizer to the entrẻes of additional titles that have been critically praised but have somehow evaded my attention. In the last several years, that’s how I happily discovered Wallace Stegner, Maryanne Wiggins, John Banville, Dawn Powell and, most recently, Paul Auster.

 

Mr. Auster has published 15 novels, several poetry collections and three screenplays. He has translated a number of books from the French and put together a National Short Story Project for National Public Radio. The Project enabled listeners to submit stories that were read over the air.

 

The Book of IllusionsOur book club read The House of Illusions in which Auster weaves an intriguing plot with stories within stories. The narrator of The House of Illusions is an English literature professor who, as a response to a family tragedy, becomes obsessed with a silent era screen star. He travels throughout the world to view and document the star’s films and writes an extensive biography. This results in a number of complications and plot twists – one scene recalls almost verbatim a scene from the movie Casablanca. Some of these plot twists may or may not be the narrator’s hallucinations. The book group could not agree on where reality or fantasy began for the narrator.

 

We also could not agree on the value of the inclusion of lengthy and detailed descriptions of several silent films. One reader cited the film decriptions as “the best part.” Others thought that they served as an intrusion into the quick moving plot which moves from place to place and includes characters who change their names, disappear and reappear.

 

The membeers of the book club all agreed that Auster is a highly imaginative, innovative and intriguing writer whose emphasis is the exploration of the nature of identity. He writes in an easy confessional (autobiographical?) style and draws on elements from suspense stories, many movies and mysteries. This keeps the reader turning the pages but leaves readers uncertain about what they’ve read.

 

We also could not agree on the value of the inclusion of lengthy detailed descriptions of several silent films. One reader cited the film descriptions as “the best part.” Others thought that they served as an intrusion into the quick moving plot which moves from place to place and includes characters who change their names, disappear and reappear.

 

The members of the book group all agreed that Auster is a highly imaginative. innovative and intriguing writer whose emphasis is the exploration of the nature of identity. He writes in an easy confessional (autobiographical?) style and draws on elements from suspense stories, many movies and mysteries. This keeps the reader turning pages but sometimes leaves readers uncertain about what they’ve read.





 

PrintFriendlyTwitterGoogle GmailYahoo MailShare

Related Articles:

  • No Related Articles Found

Sorry, comments are closed.